Know-Q-Out

  • Virender Sehwag delayed his shoulder surgery in 2011 to play a few more matches for Delhi Daredevils, putting his participation in India's tour of England in doubt

    Virender Sehwag delayed his shoulder surgery in 2011 to play a few more matches for Delhi Daredevils, putting his participation in India's tour of England in doubt

  •  Ben Hilfenhaus's Test aspirations and T20 career were on a collision course in 2012 when his fine performances in BBL and IPL were overshadowed by poor showing against SAfrica

    Ben Hilfenhaus's Test aspirations and T20 career were on a collision course in 2012 when his fine performances in BBL and IPL were overshadowed by poor showing against SAfrica

  • Gautam Gambhir aggravated a shoulder injury that he sustained during India's world cup winning campaign by playing all 15 games for his franchise in the IPL

    Gautam Gambhir aggravated a shoulder injury that he sustained during India's world cup winning campaign by playing all 15 games for his franchise in the IPL

  • Lasith Malinga's sudden retirement announcement from Test cricket in 2011 while continuing to play the shorter format of the game made a few people ask questions

    Lasith Malinga's sudden retirement announcement from Test cricket in 2011 while continuing to play the shorter format of the game made a few people ask questions

The Masala in the Club vs Country Debate

This post is part of Issue #36: Choice It is not rare to find cricket administrators, commentators and columnists talking about the club vs country debate, but while doing so, they also deal in many arguable assertions like- The format The duration, and The effect on game’s ecosystem A direct corollary of the debate is […]

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Issue #36: Choice

Economics and philosophy enthusiasts (or even if you’re a random nerd) may have heard of Jean Buridan’s ass that died of thirst and hunger on being offered hay and water. The reason? Choice and the inability to make rational decisions. A sentiment echoed by psychologist Barry Schwartz in this video (above), ‘choice has made us […]

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Weekend Reads: There Might Soon be a Cure for Runny Nose

This post is a part of Issue #35: Too good to be true 1. It’s unusual when a company as young as Facebook drops $19 billion on an acquisition, especially when its on a company some folks hadn’t even heard of. But the messaging juggernaut called WhatsApp is huge (in terms of users and messages) […]

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Straw Rules: If you Don’t Want to Break Them, Bend Them

This is part of Issue #35: Too good to be true Historians don’t know what civilization adopted the usage of straws first but the earliest known usage of straws was in 3000 B.C. by the Sumerians. But this boring history is not what this article is about, but the cool innovation in the last 150 years First, […]

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Diva makes More Money than her Office Job Broadcasting Her Meals

This is part of Issue #35: Too good to be true In modern South Korea, families are fragmenting as old social ties break down. According to a recent research paper by OECD, the number of one-person households in South Korea is expected to jump from 25.3% in 2012 to 32.7% in 2030, the fastest rate among […]

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A Letter from 96 year old Fred makes him a Youtube Star

This is part of Issue #35: Too good to be true This is a story that proves you are never too old to dream a new dream. Fred Stobaugh, from Peoria (Illinois), met Lorraine in 1938 and fell in love with her right there and then. They got married two years later. But in April 2013, […]

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Team Hoyt: The Story of a Loving Father and His Son

This is part of Issue #35: Too good to be true The story of Team Hoyt began in 1977, when a 15 year old boy in a wheelchair, Rick Hoyt, asked his father, Dick Hoyt, to participate in a five-mile road race as a charity event for a paralyzed athlete. They finished the race, second […]

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Issue #35: Too Good to be True

What we all want in life is a shot. But what we do with it that’s the story we all want to tell. This week we find some people whose stories are too good to be true. For example, pro-surfer-to-be  turned shark attack victim turned pro-surfer (watch the video) Here’s what you can look forward […]

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Weekend Reads: Does Microwave Food Kill its Nutritional Value?

This post is part of Issue #34: Food & Beverage 1. The more we learn about sugar, the more we learn it’s a good idea to limit its intake. The more we learn to limit its intake, the more we tend to switch to other sweeteners. And the more we learn that those aren’t necessarily a better […]

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Molecular Gastronomy: Born in a lab not in a kitchen

This post is part of Issue#34: Food and Beverage What is this cool term Molecular gastronomy? Molecular gastronomy is the scientific study of the process of cooking. It seeks to investigate and explain the chemical reasons behind the transformation of ingredients, as well as the social, artistic and technical components of culinary and gastronomic phenomena. The […]

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Gastronomic Conquest over Britain

This post is part of Issue #34: Food & Beverage When Britain was in process of conquering India, India was having it’s own conquest over Britain. But this was not military, rather a gastronomic one and the weapon was Curry, the generic English term to denote a wide variety of dishes whose origins are Southern and […]

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Kopi Luwak makes PETA Angry

This post is part of Issue#34: Food and Beverage Kopi Luwak or civet coffee refers to the beans of coffee berries once they have been eaten and excreted by the Asian palm civet. These beans have been spat or passed through the digestive track of a wild civet, a small nocturnal animal that forages the Indonesian […]

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Fantastic Foods and Where to Find Them

This post is part of Issue#34: Food and Beverage What happens when fiction writers don the hat of a chef? We get dishes, some of which are simply bizarre and some fantastic in their properties. Here are few for you to savour – Everlasting Gobstopper It appeared in Roald Dahl’s book Charlie and the Chocolate […]

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