Know-Q-Out

Movies Inspired by Criminals, Criminals Inspired by Movies

Sometimes serial killers, murderers, dacoits, gangsters etc. make up great subjects for writing a story. And sometimes wannabe criminals get their inspiration from these stories. Today we meet people of either kind. Gangster, Manya Surve Inspired: A 1990 film called Agneepath and a 2013 film Shootout at Wadala Manya Surve was a bright college student […]

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Weird Sports Fans Traditions

Some people love sports and thus visit stadiums to watch games live. Then there are others who are not happy with merely gracing the stadiums with their presence. So they came up with a ritual that makes them stand out from the rest. The ritual is on display every time their favourite team takes the […]

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5 Technologies Assisting in Make Policing more Effective

As the call for public safety becomes louder, the police department needs to keep itself abreast of the latest technologies available to make them more efficient. New technologies are creating greater and more powerful capabilities for humanity and the police have to match up to their pace. Thankfully, some of these innovations are making police […]

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Poor Military Decisions that have Cost India Dearly

Bad planning, lack of vision, going with the emotions and carelessness. These are a few reasons why some of India’s strategic defense decisions concerning its neighbours have haunted us in the past and will do so for some time to come. Today we revisit these decisions and how they still affect us. Kashmir Accession to […]

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6 Diplomatic Blunders That Could Have Easily been Avoided

With the Devyani Khobragade issue no more in spotlight, the US and India relations seem to have resumed normalcy. From being estranged democracies, the two nations are becoming engaged democracies. Today, we share some of the easily avoidable diplomatic blunders that the world has seen. Kuwait plays the Borat version of Kazakhstan Anthem (2012) At […]

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The Pioneers That Raised the Indian Film Industry in it Pre-1913 Days

The history of Indian cinema before 1913 is a fragmented one. And for us late 20th century types, we can’t even relive those moving images that were “A thousand times better than the live circuses performed by real persons” as most of them are lost. But what we do know is that the history of […]

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The Closest Finishes to Football Leagues Around the World

While there were no last match nail biting drama in this year’s I-League, Premier League, Bundesliga (..yawn..) and Serie A (..yawn..); the La Liga is all set for a championship showdown at Camp Nou on 17th May. Here’s a look at some of the most dramatic finishes to Football Leagues across the planet. But we […]

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India’s Biggest Technological Breakthroughs and the Men Responsible

From the time the idea of IIT was conceived by a 22 member committee headed by Nalini Ranjan Sarkar in 1946, India has embraced a series of scientific and technological developments. From Nehru’s ties with USSR for technological advancement to the boom of the BPO industry in the Dr. Manmohan era we have seen a […]

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5 Territories Strategically Annexed by India

Retired Ambassador of India to Georgia and Armenia, Mr Achal Malhotra recently said– ‘India can be said to be living in  a dangerous neighbourhood…. The South Asian region is also full of contradictions, disparities and paradoxes. In the post-colonial period, South Asia has been a theater of bloody inter-state as well as civil wars; it […]

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  • Mohamed Suharto, Indonesia (1921-2008). Suharto was the second president of Indonesia from 1967 until his resignation in 1998. It is estimated that he took with him around $35 billion. To put that into perspective, Indonesia's GDP in 1998 was $212 billion with a per capita income of $2226. He could amass such wealth because of KKN (corruption, collusion and nepotism). He handed control of state-run monopolies to family and friends, who in turn kicked back millions in tribute payments. Financial institutions were ordered to contribute a portion of their profits to his foundations, called yayasan. Suharto affiliated companies could borrow money from Indonesia's central bank without paying back a dime. He privatised the water system of Jakarta and the winning bidder had to give Suharto's son 20% of the shares. Another example, Pertamina, the state oil company was forced to trade oil through Suharto's trading companies, which charged upto 35 cents a barrel for the service.

    Mohamed Suharto, Indonesia (1921-2008). Suharto was the second president of Indonesia from 1967 until his resignation in 1998. It is estimated that he took with him around $35 billion. To put that into perspective, Indonesia's GDP in 1998 was $212 billion with a per capita income of $2226. He could amass such wealth because of KKN (corruption, collusion and nepotism). He handed control of state-run monopolies to family and friends, who in turn kicked back millions in tribute payments. Financial institutions were ordered to contribute a portion of their profits to his foundations, called yayasan. Suharto affiliated companies could borrow money from Indonesia's central bank without paying back a dime. He privatised the water system of Jakarta and the winning bidder had to give Suharto's son 20% of the shares. Another example, Pertamina, the state oil company was forced to trade oil through Suharto's trading companies, which charged upto 35 cents a barrel for the service.

  • Ferdinand Marcos, Philippines (1917-1989). Marcos was the 10th president of Philippines from 1965 to 1986. While in power he implemented wide-ranging programs of infrastructure development and economic reform. However, his administration was marred by massive authoritarian corruption, despotism, nepotism, political repression, and human rights violations. According to certain estimates, he embezzled $10 billion during his tenure.  To put that into perspective, Philippines' GDP in 1998 was $30 billion with a per capita income of $907. In Marco's 20 years in power, the country's foreign debt increased from $1 billion to $25 billion, with about a third of that debt finding its way into his pocket. The country will continue paying that debt until 2025. Marcos used the pseudonym 'William Saunders' to deposit large amounts of money in Swiss banks, he was indicted in 1988 to embezzle more than $100 million from the Philippine Government to buy three buildings in New York City.

    Ferdinand Marcos, Philippines (1917-1989). Marcos was the 10th president of Philippines from 1965 to 1986. While in power he implemented wide-ranging programs of infrastructure development and economic reform. However, his administration was marred by massive authoritarian corruption, despotism, nepotism, political repression, and human rights violations. According to certain estimates, he embezzled $10 billion during his tenure. To put that into perspective, Philippines' GDP in 1998 was $30 billion with a per capita income of $907. In Marco's 20 years in power, the country's foreign debt increased from $1 billion to $25 billion, with about a third of that debt finding its way into his pocket. The country will continue paying that debt until 2025. Marcos used the pseudonym 'William Saunders' to deposit large amounts of money in Swiss banks, he was indicted in 1988 to embezzle more than $100 million from the Philippine Government to buy three buildings in New York City.

  • Mobutu Sese Soko, Zaire (1930 - 1997). Sese Soko was the president of Zaire from 1965 to 1997. During this time he amassed wealth to the tune of $5 billion. Some people called his rule 'kleptocracy'. The nation suffered from uncontrolled inflation, a large debt, and massive currency devaluations. He became notorious for corruption, nepotism and extravagances such as Concorde flown shopping trips to Paris. To put that into perspective, Zaire's GDP in 1997 was $6 billion with a per capita income of $135. Mobutu has been called one of the world's wealthiest heads of state, a brutal dictator, an inveterate meddler in the affairs of neighbours and a colossal ego.  His cult of personality rose to such heights that for weeks at a time, Zaire's official press was forbidden to mention the name of any other Zairian than the president himself. Mobutu's eccentricities weren't just limited to financial accumulation.  In 1971, he unveiled a new twist on the official ideology with a program known as

    Mobutu Sese Soko, Zaire (1930 - 1997). Sese Soko was the president of Zaire from 1965 to 1997. During this time he amassed wealth to the tune of $5 billion. Some people called his rule 'kleptocracy'. The nation suffered from uncontrolled inflation, a large debt, and massive currency devaluations. He became notorious for corruption, nepotism and extravagances such as Concorde flown shopping trips to Paris. To put that into perspective, Zaire's GDP in 1997 was $6 billion with a per capita income of $135. Mobutu has been called one of the world's wealthiest heads of state, a brutal dictator, an inveterate meddler in the affairs of neighbours and a colossal ego. His cult of personality rose to such heights that for weeks at a time, Zaire's official press was forbidden to mention the name of any other Zairian than the president himself. Mobutu's eccentricities weren't just limited to financial accumulation. In 1971, he unveiled a new twist on the official ideology with a program known as "authenticity." Zairians were obliged to change their Western names to African ones. Mobutu sought to set the tone by replacing his given name, Joseph Desire Mobutu, with Mobutu Sese Seko Kuku Ngbendu waza Banga, which has often been translated as "the all-conquering warrior who, because of his endurance and inflexible will to win, will go from conquest to conquest leaving fire in his wake."

  • Sani Abacha, Nigeria (1943- 1998). Genaral Abacha was the de facto president of Nigeria from 1993 to 1998. His rule recorded an unprecedented economic achievements. In a matter of five years, Nigeria's foreign reserves increased 20 times, external debt reduced by 25% and inflation rate reduced from 54.5% to 8.5%. However, he siphoned off approx. $5 billion dollars from Nigeria's coffers. To put that into perspective, Nigeria's GDP in 1998 was $36 billion with a per capita income of $673. Abacha would approve fake funding requests from his national security adviser and launder the money to offshore accounts. Most of his money was made through bribes from foreign companies looking for licenses to search for oil in the Niger river basin or from construction companies  that won contracts to build drilling rigs and pipelines. He found a new form of corruption that almost killed the Nigerian economy- the siphoning of money used by Nigeria's oil refineries to turn crude into gasoline. Here's the real icing on the cake- when he died, his wife was caught trying to leave the country with 38 suitcases stuffed with cash.

    Sani Abacha, Nigeria (1943- 1998). Genaral Abacha was the de facto president of Nigeria from 1993 to 1998. His rule recorded an unprecedented economic achievements. In a matter of five years, Nigeria's foreign reserves increased 20 times, external debt reduced by 25% and inflation rate reduced from 54.5% to 8.5%. However, he siphoned off approx. $5 billion dollars from Nigeria's coffers. To put that into perspective, Nigeria's GDP in 1998 was $36 billion with a per capita income of $673. Abacha would approve fake funding requests from his national security adviser and launder the money to offshore accounts. Most of his money was made through bribes from foreign companies looking for licenses to search for oil in the Niger river basin or from construction companies that won contracts to build drilling rigs and pipelines. He found a new form of corruption that almost killed the Nigerian economy- the siphoning of money used by Nigeria's oil refineries to turn crude into gasoline. Here's the real icing on the cake- when he died, his wife was caught trying to leave the country with 38 suitcases stuffed with cash.

  • Slobodan Milosevic, Serbia/Yugoslavia (1941-2006). Milosevic was the president of Serbia from 1989 to 1997 and of Yugoslavia from 1997 to 2000. During this time he pocketed a cool $1 billion. To put that into perspective, Serbia's GDP in 1997 was $21 billion with a per capita income of $673. As president, he resisted political and economic reform, challenging multiparty elections and moderate federalist policies. His actions increased tensions, which led to the breakup of the Yugoslav Republic. He was indicted in 2001 for crimes against humanity and embezzlement of funds.  During years of U.N. trade sanctions, the black market generated vast sums of money for the Milosevic regime.   The market for the illegal cigarette operation was created in Yugoslavia, and he supported this because one of the main dealers of cigarettes was his son, Marko Milosevic. Through approval of state banks in the 90s, he made millions of dollars directly from people by transferring his shady banking money abroad.

    Slobodan Milosevic, Serbia/Yugoslavia (1941-2006). Milosevic was the president of Serbia from 1989 to 1997 and of Yugoslavia from 1997 to 2000. During this time he pocketed a cool $1 billion. To put that into perspective, Serbia's GDP in 1997 was $21 billion with a per capita income of $673. As president, he resisted political and economic reform, challenging multiparty elections and moderate federalist policies. His actions increased tensions, which led to the breakup of the Yugoslav Republic. He was indicted in 2001 for crimes against humanity and embezzlement of funds. During years of U.N. trade sanctions, the black market generated vast sums of money for the Milosevic regime. The market for the illegal cigarette operation was created in Yugoslavia, and he supported this because one of the main dealers of cigarettes was his son, Marko Milosevic. Through approval of state banks in the 90s, he made millions of dollars directly from people by transferring his shady banking money abroad.

World’s Most Corrupt Leaders in Recent Times

In this season of elections where most candidates are trying everything but the kitchen sink to tarnish the image of their opponent, we’re reminded of some genuinely corrupt world leaders who have been accused of embezzling the most funds from their countries.

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Indian Musicians of the Medieval Period

In the medieval era due to external influences of the Muslim rulers that invaded India from the Northwest, the music in the North underwent several changes whereas the music in the South continued to develop along the same lines without any external influence. This resulted in the birth of two distinct systems of music: Carnatic […]

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Hybrid Sports You Must Try for Kicks

What do you get when you have two usual sports and an itch to mix them up? Think. Think Again. Ok, I’ll tell you. A hybrid sport. Here are a few of them popular enough to have a world championship of their own. Kronum Combination of- Football, Basketball, Lacrosse and Handball Invented in 2008 by […]

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Some Unusual Natural Phenomenon Found in India

We take for granted whatever we are used to seeing around us in the world. Heck, even Haley’s comet or Aurora Borealis don’t excite us no more. But hey, keep the camera ready because you never know when Volcanic lightning strikes or when the sky has a fire rainbow. But with these cases you’d rather […]

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6 Infamous Political Conspiracies that make History Interesting

No matter how absurdly unbelievable some political conspiracies are people love making them a part of their conversations. Some of these theories feature regularly in the media when they decide to target a subject . Cough.. Elections.. Cough cough. And these 6 political conspiracies have really helped mediawallahs to fill in their pages when they […]

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